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KCRG TV9 First Alert Forecast for Dubuque and the Tri-States

KCRG TV9 FIRST ALERT FORECAST FOR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2018

WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR DELAWARE COUNTY UNTIL NOON AND CLAYTON COUNTY UNTIL 6PM.

TODAY: CLOUDY AND BREEZY WITH RAIN, MAINLY THROUGH EARLY AFTERNOON. NEAR
STEADY TEMPERATURES. NORTHWEST WIND 10-20 MPH.

TONIGHT: MOSTLY CLOUDY, WINDY AND COLDER. LOW 13. NORTHWEST WIND
15-25 MPH.

TOMORROW: MOSTLY CLOUDY. HIGH 26.

EXTENDED OUTLOOK THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY:

A CHANCE OF RAIN AND SNOW THURSDAY AND SATURDAY, DRY FRIDAY. HIGH ‘S IN THE 39’S & 40’S. LOW’S IN THE 20’S & 30’S.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER STAGE AT DUBUQUE: 9FEET AND RISING

KCRG Weather Blog

Huge rain potential to our south

This very slow moving cold front that brought us rounds of showers and thunderstorms is very slowly pushing south. The fight between winter and spring continues! Multiple rounds of low pressure will move along that stalled front in the southern Plains and will lead to flooding in that area. There is a very good chance many areas will exceed four inches of rain, with isolated spots probably getting closer to eight! River flooding will be a huge problem in that part of the country and may become a national headline in the coming days.

Streams, some rivers running high through Tuesday night

Rain falling on frozen ground has run off into streams and rivers, causing some of them to rise to bankfull or even going out of their banks. On most streams, water will recede Tuesday evening or night. If you come across a flooded road, do not try to drive across it – find another route. The English River at Kalona rose into minor flood stage Tuesday and will crest just below 16 feet Tuesday night. That means flooding will affect agricultural areas and will come short of flooding nearby county roads. It’ll fall back below flood stage Wednesday morning. Otherwise, the rain and freezing rain have ended. Main roads are in good shape and ought to stay that way. Some bridges, as well as rural or less-traveled roads, may be slick. That’s especially the case toward northern and central Iowa where more freezing rain fell during Monday night. Another round of a wintry mix is likely Thursday into Thursday night. There is a potential for freezing rain sometime during that period, although it depends greatly on what temperatures end up doing.

How the different types of precipitation happen

Temperature obviously is important in determining what type of precipitation occurs. But it’s not just the temperature your backyard thermometer reads – equally important are temperatures aloft. Rain and snow are the easy ones. When the temperature is above freezing in a deep enough layer above the ground, rain will fall. Snow (which is not frozen raindrops) happens when the air is below freezing from the cloud down to at least near the ground. Sometimes we get snow when the temperature is above freezing, but that warmer layer isn’t deep enough to give snowflakes enough time to melt into rain. Sleet occurs when rain falls through above-freezing air aloft, but below-freezing air near the ground is deep enough that raindrops have time to freeze into ice pellets on the way down. Freezing rain occurs when the air is above-freezing, but the surface (whether it’s a road, a power line, the ground, etc.) is below freezing. Icing develops after the liquid rain has made contact.

Areas of freezing rain Monday night through Tuesday morning

A band of freezing rain is likely across central through northeastern Iowa Monday night into Tuesday morning. There will probably be a sharp cutoff in the amount of icing on the southeast edge. Temperatures will be important in determining who gets what. Areas that are 32 degrees and colder will have ice, while places that are above 32 degrees will have rain until dropping below freezing. Bridges and overpasses will generally be the first roads to turn icy. Areas roughly southeast of Williamsburg to Cedar Rapids to Dubuque should be warm enough to be all, or nearly all, rain for this event. Farther northwest, the potential ice accumulations will increase. Places northwest of Tama to Waterloo to Prairie du Chien have the highest chance of getting at least two-tenths of an inch of ice. Precipitation will taper off from west to east, exiting the TV9 viewing area by early afternoon. Roads that were icy in the morning will take time to improve, even after the precipitation ends. It’s important to remember that the track of this system will affect temperatures and the amount of moisture. Literally, one degree can make the difference between rain and freezing rain. Stay with KCRG-TV9 for updates on-air and online.

Snow totals from Saturday: February 17, 2018

Here is a look at snowfall totals from Saturday based on reports from across eastern Iowa. Reports with a number and letters before the city are a description of distance and direction from the center of the city. LOWDEN 2.4’’ E SOLON 2.2’’ 1 SSW NORTH LIBERTY 2.0’’ 2 NW MARION 2.0’’ 2 NNW MUSCATINE 1.9’’ 1 WSW IOWA CITY 1.8’’ ANAMOSA 1.8’’ 3 NNW CEDAR RAPIDS 1.8’’ 5 NW CEDAR RAPIDS 1.8’’ 5 NW CEDAR RAPIDS 1.8’’ 1 ENE MOUNT VERNON 1.8’’ 1 SE VINTON 1.7’’ 2 WSW IOWA CITY 1.7’’ 2 NNE CEDAR RAPIDS 1.7’’ NNW SPRINGVILLE 1.7’’ W BELLE PLAINE 1.5’’ 1 SSE CEDAR RAPIDS 1.5’’ 3 N MARION 1.5’’ HATFIELD 1.4’’ SE STANWOOD 1.2’’ 1 E CLINTON 1.0’’ 1 SSE CEDAR RAPIDS 1.0’’ 3 W CEDAR RAPIDS 1.0’’ CEDAR FALLS 0.8’’ 2 SSE WATERLOO 0.6’’ HATFIELD 0.6’’